Positive News for the Ocean

Canceled vacations, temporary beach closures, and a strict "no surfing" policy has us all missing the deep blue. Here's a quick read to help you see the brighter side of the situation and to celebrate the positive things currently happening in our oceans. 

 

1) Florida scientists are celebrating rare species reproduction.

Positive Ocean News by sustainable swimwear brand, MAGDAKINEDESIGNS

Ridged cactus corals have started reproducing in a lab for the first time at the Florida Aquarium Center of Conservation. The lab-based reproductive efforts could benefit coral species around the world currently threatened by rising temperatures and warming oceans. Source: NBCnews

 

2. Whales are finally relaxing in silence.

Positive Ocean News by sustainable swimwear brand, MAGDAKINEDESIGNS

Observatories in Vancouver BC saw a significant drop in low-frequency sounds underwater that normally come from ships at sea.  This man-made underwater noise linked to chronic stress in whales is currently at an all-time low. The pause in noise has provided an opportunity for oceanographers to study the effects that noise pollution has on marine mammals. Source: The Guardian 

 

3. Southern California waves are glowing, literally.

Positive Ocean News by sustainable swimwear brand, MAGDAKINEDESIGNS

Rare bioluminescence returns to Newport Beach for the first time in five years. A little internet digging verifies that the current COVID lockdown is not the culprit of the bioluminescent return, but it’s still pretty amazing. A thick red tide that occurs occasionally in Southern California brings the glowing marine plankton (dinoflagellates) to the coast for a spectacular evening light show. Source: LA Times

 

4. Australian scuba tour companies are keeping busy by planting coral.

Positive Ocean News by sustainable swimwear brand, MAGDAKINEDESIGNS

After tour businesses were shut down in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, one Australian scuba company decided to volunteer their catamaran and staff to help researchers study and plant corals on the Great Barrier Reef. About 1,000 pieces of coral have already been planted and the tour company plans to bring their passengers to snorkel over the site when normal business resumes. Source: Healthy Life Boxx

 

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